Chicago: A Great Place to Grab Breakfast

John’s Place, Roscoe Village pic
John’s Place, Roscoe Village
Image: johnsplace.com

Ryan Snell is a sales executive who excels in start-up environments with a track record of successfully defining new markets and penetrating those markets to introduce new products. Ryan Snell is a big fan of breakfast restaurants in his home city, Chicago.

The Publican in the west loop is a favorite for both locals and those visiting Chicago. The restaurant specializes in pork and shellfish and they incorporate that into their various breakfast dishes like an omelet wrapped around a smoked sablefish.

John’s Place in Roscoe Village is a popular destination for locals. They are known for their comfort foods with a focus on healthy eating.

Longman and Eagle in Logan Square is one of the city’s most popular restaurants, specializing in brunch and chicken and waffles. On weekends they have a donut shop.

Bite Café in Ukranian Village serves up breakfast with a twist. Dishes like their breakfast poutine and breakfast tacos are to be enjoyed while also listening to loud music as they are located right next door to the Empty Bottle, a popular music venue in Chicago that hosts a lot of punk acts.

Star Wars – A Tough Sell Cracking the Chinese Market

Star Wars pic
Star Wars
Image: wired.com

Ryan Snell is a longtime Chicago entrepreneur who focuses on providing enterprise IT solutions to large organizations. Ryan Snell is an avid moviegoer who has an interest in the Hollywood film industry and the science of what drives box office projections and results.

A recent article in Wired examined Disney’s strategy in targeting the Chinese market with its its worldwide blockbuster Star Wars: The Force Awakens.

The Chinese moviegoing audience is seen as particularly challenging when it comes to Star Wars, in part because the previous films were not shown in movie theaters in the Communist country when initially released in the 1970s and 1980s. For this reason, there is not intense nostalgia associated with seeing a reappearance of the likes of C3PO, Chewbacca, Han Solo, and Princess Leia. Despite this, superfans of the original trilogy do exist, largely due to bootleg DVDs becoming widespread in the 1990s.

The series of Star Wars “prequels” helmed by George Lucas had moderate success in China, though they did make the top 10 in each respective year of their release. Marketing efforts have been varied for the latest Star Wars episode and have included enlisting the singing talent of the “Justin Bieber of China,” Lu Han. In late January 2016, the verdict came in: Star Wars, though grossing $860 million worldwide, stumbled in China with a relatively small $100 million gross. This ended any hope the movie had of surpassing Titanic as the world’s highest grossing film ever.

The Halo Device Lights Up with Your Mood

Halo pic
Halo
Image: holohalo.net

Enterprise IT solutions are Ryan Snell’s stock and trade, where he serves as the vice president of sales for early stage companies and is based out of Chicago. Ryan Snell aids business customers across the globe in securing the enterprise. Ryan Snell also maintains a personal interest in wearable technologies, such as the Halo.

The Halo is a device consisting of a large hoop that illuminates the face with 180 LEDs. Their color is determined by a synced app that chooses hues based on one’s mood, emotions, and even the weather. The gadget currently relies on straps around the shoulders to hold it in front of the face.

The inventor of the Halo acknowledges its similarity to selfies. Just as selfies enable users to present a certain impression to the cyber world, Halo lets users select the image they wish to present to the real world.

The Halo has been evaluated in situations such as Halloween trick or treating and improvisational theater, and it won an award in Japan for its aesthetic values. Later versions of the device could help waiters present an inviting image to diners and could replace make-up with light patterns that accentuate desirable facial features.

Details of a Basic Drum Kit

Basic Drum Kit pic
Basic Drum Kit
Image: guitarcenter.com

Ryan Snell of Chicago is a vice president of sales in the enterprise IT industry. As a sales executive, Ryan builds organizations that enable early stage companies to rapidly introduce disruptive and emerging technologies to market. In his private life, Ryan Snell loves drumming, and he plans to buy a new drum set and teach his son.

The number of drums in a kit varies, but a basic set includes the bass or kick drum, a snare drum, mounted, rack tom-toms, a floor tom, and cymbals.

The bass drum is the largest in the kit and produces a thumping sound when the drummer strikes the foot pedal. It is generally played on the first and third beats of 4/4 rock music. Most bass drums are made from wood, such as maple or mahogany.

Snare drums produce a cracking, sharp sound. Situated in the center of the drum kit, the snare is framed by a shallow, round shell, usually made of metal, such as brass or aluminum, and the drum head is tuned tightly, usually to a high C. Snares drawn across the bottom drum head provide the crisp sound. The snare drum generally provides the backbeat in rock songs.

Rack toms make a variety of tones, descending in pitch from the snare drum and varying in tone according to the diameter of the shell. They are generally mounted on the bass drum, but some are attached to a separate rack or holder instead. The floor tom is the largest tom-tom and the deepest in tone, and it comes in various sizes.

Cymbals round out a basic drum kit. They serve to add accents to the music and range in size from 6 to 30 inches.